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Our Components

The consortium defines an « out of school child » as any child who has no access to,has dropped out from, or isnot enrolled on some form of accredited education; in Cambodia they can be broadly grouped into five categories, which each face diverse challenges.


 

Context

 

The number of children living and/or working on the street in Cambodia is estimated at 12,000 to 20,000, and increasing at a rate of 20% each year. When on the street young people face increased susceptibility to exploitation, abuse and illness. Because of their poor and unstable living conditions these children are highly vulnerable towards risks of exploitation, trafficking, sexual abuse, violence, etc. This insecure and transient existence is incompatible with the demands of schooling, resulting in large-scale absenteeism, drop-outs and grade repetitions as children struggle to cope.

 

Child trafficking and unsafe migration are critical challenges. Many factors contributed to these issues, such as poverty, one of the most important factors and other factors including lack of education, domestic violence, lack of employment and lack of opportunities for safe migration.

 

Action

 

The ultimate goal of the project is to support the implementation of the Cambodian Education for All National Plan 2003-2015, including the National Child Friendly School Policy and support the achievement of the Cambodia Millennium Development Goal 2 on Education, through promoting  equitable access and improved quality education.

 

In order to ensure equitable access to education the project conducts enrolment campaign for out of school children (OSC), school mapping, provides scholarships to poor children in according to set criteria and facilitates meetings with parents, teachers and other stakeholders about education and reintegration interventions.

 

In relation to effective learning and teaching, the project establishes drop-in centres for remedial education for OSC, re-entry classes for dropped out children, opening support class for reintegrated students in public schools, individual follow-up and on-going support. The project also provides training for teachers, sets up mobile libraries for parents and provides awareness raising to school management, local authorities and other relevant stakeholders.

 

The project also makes its efforts on capacity building for the communities, local authorities and school administrators in order for them to receive skills and confidence in their participation and to take more ownership in their supporting role to the project implementation.

 

Impact

 

The project directly targets 5,270 Out of School Children. The project also targets 722 teachers and 2,620 school support committee members, parents and relevant local authority as indirect beneficiaries. 


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© CCOSC/Save the Children

Context

 

Poverty and isolation are significant barriers to education. According to a survey conducted by National Institute of Statistics, 26.4% of children aged 6-17 could not go to school as they were compelled to contribute to household income. Many of the poorest live in the most isolated locations, where schools have the highest student ratios. Trading school for work is becoming an increasingly acute problem due to the implantation of rubber plantations and garment factories in those areas. Moreover, according to EMIS 2012-13, the gross enrolment rate was 131.96%, net enrolment rate was 96.33%, and dropout rate was 11.26%. These reflect that there was 35.63% who enrolled but did not attend school, plus 11.26% who were dropped out. Those are out of school children (OOSC). The imparity between urban and rural is still a significant gap. The children in the rural areas, especially those from minority ethnic groups, have very limited opportunities to access quality basic education.

 

Action

 

To Identify, enrol, retain and ensure quality education for OOSC, the program will provide many interventions such as: to improve school management information system by developing/updating their school mapping to find out the out of school children, promote effective enrolment campaigns by SSC with participation from children and teachers, improve school facilities with community participation and contribution, especially in the new settlement areas, provide means to OOSC to access primary school, improve teaching pedagogy and relevant learning contents to respond to the needs of all OOSC, enhance the involvement of local mechanisms (SSC, Children Councils, CCWC/ CEFAC) in promoting enrolment and school management, improve livelihoods of OOSC households to support their children to go to school and finally improve efficient school tracking and necessary guidance for schools to support OOSC. Moreover, the program will conduct the advocacy and research from community to national level such as conducting community forums, sharing the best practice through NGOs Education Partnership, consultation with the MoEYS and lobbying the policy makers to be committed to reaching out of school children.

 

Impact

 

The program will target 28,650 Out of School Children, which 50% of them are girls, 1,771 teachers and 2,382 school support committee members, 404 school principals, 84,880 parents and relevant local authorities as direct beneficiaries.


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© CCOSC/EpicArts

Context

 

Cambodia has undergone two decades of isolation and conflict that devastated much of the country’s physical, social and human capital. This chaos history has left a legacy of high prevalence of people with disabilities of all ages and conditions. The prevalence is also affected by poverty, malnutrition and diseases with over half of the conditions being preventable. There are no reliable statistics of prevalence of disability in Cambodia. The latest figures published by the Cambodian National Institute of Statistics in 2011 estimates that 8.1% of the Cambodian population lives with a form of handicap. Children with disabilities (CWD) are one of the most vulnerable groups in the country and are the least likely to be in school (World Vision, 2004). A disability prevalence survey conducted in 2011 by UNICEF showed that while average children in Cambodia have an out of school rate of 15% the out of school rate for children with disabilities is of 30%. Another study, conducted in the framework of the Global Education Partnership (GPE) in 2012 in 7 provinces of Cambodia, underlined that 58.1% of children with severe disabilities never attended school (46% for children with moderate disabilities).

 

Action

 

The project aims at contributing to the development of inclusive education in Cambodia.

 

The principle of inclusive education was adopted at the Salamanca World Conference on Special Needs Education and is founded on the basis that it is “the responsibility of the regular system to educate all children”.

 

By providing specific answers to the Cambodian education system on how to integrate Children With Disability that have been out of school, the project is contributing in the transformation of the education system in order to respond to the diversity of learners.

 

Specifically, the project aims at adapting mainstream schools and training educational actors for children with mild to severe disabilities to go to school, in mainstream or integrated/specialized classes. The project also supports families of children with disabilities through income generation activities and parenting support. Finally, the project as a whole will advocate for the right of people and most specifically children with disabilities in communities and at national level.

 

Impact

 

Through this project, at least 1,884 out of school children and especially children with physical and intellectual disabilities will have access to quality education allowing them to have in the future an active role in the society. 1,151 teachers will be trained on inclusive education and on specialized education for teachers working with children with intellectual disabilities. 210 school directors are better equipped to identify and welcome children with disabilities in their schools. 1,680 parents will be fully aware of the potential of their child and of the benefits for him/her to go to school. 641 of them will be able to start income generation activities.

 

Local authorities, other educational actors, peer children in mainstream schools will have a better understanding of disabilities and will be able to include more children with disabilities in the communities.


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© CCOSC/KAPE

Context

 

Children issued from ethnic minorities are highly concentrated in five provinces in the north part of Cambodia including Mondulkiri and Ratanikiri provinces, where there are the worst transition rates to lower secondary school in the country. The remoteness of the provinces located in the mountainous Khmer jungle in the North East, the language and cultural barriers in addition to poverty are all impeding factors to schooling for ethnic minority children such as Phnorng, Kuoy, Tumpuon and kroeung. Children who attend school in an unfamiliar language and culture are less likely to succeed their study. This results in low attainment and high dropout rates, thus continuing a vicious cycle of exclusion from the wider community.

 

Similarly, Children in Tbong Khmum and Kratie provinces are also alienated from education in a similar way. These targeted areas have a high concentration of Cham, Phnong, and Kuoy minority children as well as those whose families work in big plantations run by large agro-businesses. These plantations take in cassava, rubber, and tobacco among other cash crops. Target schools report high dropout rates, especially in the upper primary school grades, where upper primary children are drawn to premature employment opportunities in the plantations. Dropout rates in target districts range from 13% to 30%, depending on proximity to plantations and local factories.

 

Action

 

The project is aiming at assisting the ethnic minority children to access schooling and retain in school for the whole primary education level. The project will work on Multilanguage Education as a successful strategy for ensuring access to and success in primary education of ethnic minority children; thus the Bilingual Classroom activities will be done to all project target groups. In addition, the project also strengthens knowledge and capacity of different stakeholders, particularly education actors and parents to provide support to children in schooling with quality for the whole primary education level.

 

As a result from the school mapping and school improvement plans, KAPE partner addresses both equitable access and quality education though capacity building and participation of local committees (i.e. SSC, commune councils). The interventions include building intermediate classroom (ICR) for small children who live far from schools, provide scholarship to the poorest of the poor, health referrals and child-to-child network as means for children to access primary education. The project also focuses on classroom enhancement and sets up local teacher supervision system to ensure that the quality of teaching is improved and tailored to the needs of out of school children and that student’ s learning outcomes are improved. Families of out of school children are identified and are aware of importance of education through advocacy workshops with families of out of school children.

 

Impact

 

The project’s direct beneficiaries are 3,994 ethnic minority children as new enrollment and 80% of them retained schooling for the whole primary education level. The project impact is emphasizing on the increasing in enrollment and retention rates of ethnic minority children.


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Context

 

Based on the MoEYS of Cambodia, the net enrolment rate at the primary level appears impressive. However, the large number of students enrolls, but some of them do not attend school. Many do not attend school or attend for some months or years but drop out before completing the six years of primary school education. Due to the families’ economic hardship, the children need to work to supplement the families’ income, instead of going to school. More often than not, the families cannot afford to buy the necessities such as school uniforms and study materials for their children to go to school. When the children spend a year or more without going to school, they become older (over-aged) than most of the students with whom they share the classroom when they decide to re-enroll in school.  It is often difficult for the over-aged out of school children (OSC) to re-enroll and to stay enrolled in school because they are often subject to ridicule and discrimination by their peers.

 

According to the situation analysis of children and women in Cambodia 2009, the statistics in year 2007-2008 showed that the NER in Primary Schools in Cambodia was 93.3%, 92.7% (urban), 93.6 (rural) and 88.4% (remote). Over-age was 50.3%. In urban areas one third of the children admitted to first grade were over-age (33.5%), and in rural areas the rate was just over one third (36.4 %). The national average rate was 36.7%. Thus, it has been recommended that “continued careful, culturally sensitive interventions are needed, particularly in the remote border provinces. (UNICEF, 2009) 

 

Action

 

In order to ensure that over-aged children have access to Accelerated Learning Program, Pour un Sourire d’Enfant (PSE) uses its strategic interventions which include identifying families with over-aged out of school children (OSC) to access primary education, and scholarship provision. To promote quality teaching and learning and as part of capacity development for school educators, PSE and MoEYS facilitates the training to teachers and school directors on the use of a textbook, specifically made for the accelerated learning program, monitoring students’ performance, conducting program review and reflection on the project implementation and improvement. PSE also works with educational authorities to include OSC into community development plan, conduct class observation by sub-national trainers and national trainers, monitoring by District Training and Monitoring Team (DTMT), and conduct regular meeting for management effectiveness. In particular, for the sake of awareness on value of education towards community people as well as educational actors, education campaigns are conducted with distribution of flyers to communities in cooperation with commune chiefs, village chiefs, schools, and authorities in education in addition to parental meetings at schools and mainstreaming accelerated learning program at the school year opening ceremony. Also, the project is launched to raise awareness on the importance of the accelerated learning program to stakeholders and partners working on over-aged OSC.  

 

Impact

 

Direct beneficiaries: the project directly targets 20,100 children over three years and a half, with 6,100 students as an average per year. In addition, 160 teachers and 30 school directors directly benefit from the project per year.

 

Indirect beneficiaries: the project will also indirectly cover 1,220 out of 6,100 families per year (roughly 20%), 28 Trainers of Teachers from DOE and 10 Trainers of Teachers from POE. The expected results from these interventions are; 1) The OOSC in project target areas have access to and have been encouraged to complete primary education level, 2) Teaching quality is improved and tailored to the needs of OOSC, 3) Education leaders/providers are better equipped to improve the education efficiency, and 4) Communities are better aware of the importance of integrating all OOSC in community life.


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Our Intervention Areas  (31 December 2014)